Below are two role play scenarios.

1: Assistant Principal

You are the assistant principal at an elementary school. Twelve teachers report to you. One is Jan Wilson, who has been with you for three years. Jan teaches fourth grade. She has an excellent record as a teacher and is well liked by her students’ parents.

A well-known rule at your school deals with teacher absences—when a teacher will miss classes because of illness or emergency, your office should be notified so a substitute teacher can be employed. Earlier in the year, Jan failed to show up for class and did not notify you until later in the day. You scurried to cover Jan’s class, and when Jan returned the following day, you reminded her of the notification policy. You learned her absence was related to a family emergency with one of her elderly parents.

Yesterday, it happened again. A teacher from an adjacent classroom notified you Jan’s class was unattended. Again, you exerted much energy finding a temporary replacement for the rest of the day. Jan did leave a short voicemail at 10:30 a.m. yesterday for you in which she apologized for the inconvenience and said she would be back in class today. No reason for her absence or late notification was offered.

Today, you made it a point to pass Jan’s classroom shortly before class began. You asked if everything was okay, and Jan responded, “Yes, thank you.” You then asked Jan to drop by your office at 3:15 p.m. following dismissal of classes.

Answer the following:

1. Which coaching function will you use and why?

2. Using at least three different coaching core skills, prepare a basic framework for your upcoming meeting. Note which skill you are using in each.

3. What reasons/excuses do you anticipate Jan/Kelly will report? List at least three.

4. Prepare responses that would be suitable for each reason/excuse given in question 3.

5. How would you follow up after the meeting?